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University of Tennessee, Knoxville    
 
    
 
  Nov 23, 2017
 
2017-2018 Undergraduate Catalog

General Education Requirements


Introduction
For Building Basic Skills  

Communicating through Writing  
Communicating Orally  
Quantitative Reasoning  

For Developing Broadened Perspectives  

Arts and Humanities  
Cultures and Civilizations  
Natural Sciences  
Social Sciences  

2017-2018 University General Education Requirement

Statement of Purpose. General education provides students with the foundation for successful academic study, for lifelong learning, and for carrying out the duties of local, national, and global citizenship. The university's general education curriculum is designed to help students better understand themselves, human cultures and societies, and the natural world, and to contribute to their personal enrichment while enrolled and after graduation.

The general education program focuses on "Building Basic Skills" and on "Developing Broadened Perspectives":

Building Basic Skills: Because the hallmark of the educated person is the ability to think independently, students must be trained to acquire, evaluate, and use information and to apply it in their written, oral, and mathematical expression. They must write clearly, speak convincingly, and solve problems using logical and critical reasoning.

Developing Broadened Perspectives: General education should help students develop habits of self-examination in the context of their relationship to family, community, local and global societies, and the natural world. To this end, general education should help foster a commitment to respecting the diversity of personal and cultural values. Students should be able to explain their own values and beliefs, as well as to understand the histories and cultures behind those values. Students should study the historical traditions and artistic works of other cultures, both within and outside the United States, and the fundamental principles and chief discoveries of the scientific disciplines. They should strengthen their sensitivity to cultural diversity by studying the dynamic nature of a multicultural world through interdisciplinary perspectives or by learning other languages.

The design of the University of Tennessee's general education program enables students to move among colleges within the university or to move to another institution of higher learning. Although general education provides students with the foundational skills required for college study, those skills are specific neither to UT nor to a particular major or career path.

Requirements and Outcomes. The general education requirements and the student learning outcomes expected for each area are listed below. (See Notes).

A. For Building Basic Skills


I. Communicating through Writing (WC)


(3 courses including ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  or equivalent plus an approved writing-intensive course)

Good writing skills enable students to create and share ideas, investigate and describe values, and record and explain discoveries – all skills that are necessary not only for professional success but also for personal fulfillment. Students must be able to write correctly, and they must be able to locate relevant information, evaluate its usefulness and quality, and incorporate it logically and ethically to support ideas and claims.

Courses in this area are expected to produce the following outcomes for students:

  1. Students will demonstrate the ability to write clearly and correctly, employing the conventions of standard American English.
  2. Students will demonstrate the ability to write effectively for different audiences and purposes, shaping content, organization, and style to correspond with appropriate disciplinary expectations and rhetorical contexts.
  3. Students will demonstrate the ability to locate and use relevant, credible evidence to support ideas.
  4. Students will demonstrate the ability to cite and document sources in keeping with appropriate disciplinary conventions.

Students may satisfy the first-year composition requirement in one of two ways:

  1. By completing 6 hours in English writing courses according to one of the following 4 sequences:
  • ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  
  • ENGL 118  and ENGL 102 . Students who earn a B or higher in ENGL 118  may complete their first-year composition requirement with ENGL 102 , a sophomore-level course in the English department, or ENGL 355 . The sophomore course, if designated AH, may also be used toward the Arts and Humanities General Education requirement.  Eligibility for ENGL 118  will be determined by ACT or SAT scores.
  • ENGL 131  and ENGL 132 . Placement in ENGL 131  or ENGL 132  will be determined by TOEFL (or equivalent standardized test) scores.
  • ENGL 198  and ENGL 298  (for Chancellor's Honors Program students only)
  1. By earning credit for ENGL 101  through a College Board Advanced Placement Test and completing one additional course from the following: 

Upon completion of ENGL 101  and ENGL 102  or their equivalent, students must take one other approved WC course. The WC course can be within the student's major or an elective.

Approved Communicating Through Writing (WC) Courses

Aerospace Engineering
      AE 449 - Aerospace Engineering Laboratory  

Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communications
      ALEC 440 - Communication Techniques in Agriculture  

American Studies
      AMST 312 - Popular Culture and American Politics  

Anthropology
      ANTH 210 - Principles of Biological Anthropology  

Architecture
      ARCH 213 - Modern Architecture: Histories and Theories 
      ARCH 227 - Honors: Modern Architecture Histories and Theories  

Art History
      ARTH 402 - Seminar in Art History II  

Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology
      BCMB 409 - Perspectives in Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology  

Biomedical Engineering
      BME 430 - Biomedical Engineering Laboratory  

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
      CBE 415 - Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Laboratory  

Chemistry
      CHEM 449 - Advanced Synthesis Laboratory  
      CHEM 459 - Advanced Measurement and Spectroscopy Laboratory  

Child and Family Studies
      CFS 405 - Development of Professional Skills  

Cinema Studies
      CNST 312 - Popular Culture and American Politics  

Civil Engineering
      CE 205 - Professional Development I  

Computer Science
      COSC 402 - Senior Design Practicum  

Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
      EEB 409 - Perspectives in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology  

Electrical and Computer Engineering
      ECE 402 - Senior Design Practicum  

English
      ENGL 206 - Introduction to Shakespeare  
      ENGL 207 - Honors: British Literature I 
      ENGL 208 - Honors: British Literature II  
      ENGL 237 - Honors: American Literature I: Colonial Era to the Civil War 
      ENGL 238 - Honors: American Literature II: Civil War to the Present 
      ENGL 247 - Honors: Introduction to Poetry  
      ENGL 248 - Honors: Introduction to Drama 
      ENGL 251 - Introduction to Poetry  
      ENGL 252 - Introduction to Drama 
      ENGL 253 - Introduction to Fiction  
      ENGL 254 - Themes in Literature 
      ENGL 255 - Public Writing  
      ENGL 257 - Honors: Public Writing 
      ENGL 258 - Honors: Introduction to Fiction 
      ENGL 261 - Themes in Creative Writing 
      ENGL 263 - Introduction to Creative Writing  
      ENGL 277 - Honors: Introduction to Creative Writing  
      ENGL 295 - Writing in the Workplace 
      ENGL 355 - Rhetoric and Writing  
      ENGL 357 - Honors: Rhetoric and Writing 
      ENGL 360 - Technical and Professional Writing  
      ENGL 376 - Colloquium in Literature 
      ENGL 377 - Honors: Colloquium in Literature 
      ENGL 398 - Junior-Senior Honors Seminar 
      ENGL 455 - Persuasive Writing  
      ENGL 497 - Honors: Senior Seminar  

Forestry
      FORS 321 - Wildland Recreation 
      FORS 327 - Honors: Wildland Recreation   

Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries
      FWF 312 - Principles of Silviculture   

German
      GERM 363 - Contemporary German Cultures   
      GERM 370 - Witches: Myth, Reality, and Representation  

History
      HIST 408 - Honors: Senior Paper 
      HIST 499 - Senior Research Seminar  

Hotel, Restaurant, and Tourism
      HRT 390 - Professional Development  

Haslam Scholars Program
      HSP 287 - Knowledge:  

Industrial Engineering
      IE 350 - Leadership in Industrial Engineering II: Team Building Skills   
      IE 422 - Industrial Engineering Design II   

Information Sciences
      INSC 450 - Writing About Science and Medicine  

Journalism and Electronic Media
      JREM 200 - Multimedia Writing  
      JREM 414 - Magazine and Feature Writing 
      JREM 444 - Journalism as Literature 
      JREM 450 - Writing about Science and Medicine 
      JREM 451 - Environmental Writing 
      JREM 456 - Science Writing as Literature   

Judaic Studies
      JST 322 - Medieval Philosophy 
      JST 413 - Seminar in Early Judaism  

Materials Science and Engineering
      MSE 304 - Principles of Materials Laboratory II  
      MSE 405 - Structural Characterization of Materials  

Mathematics Education
      MEDU 432 - Knowing and Learning in Mathematics and Science   

Mechanical Engineering
      ME 449 - Mechanical Engineering Laboratory   

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
      MRST 322 - Medieval Philosophy  

Military Science and Leadership
      MLSL 303 - Leadership in Military History  

Music Education
      MUED 430 - Music Methods for High School   

Musicology
      MUCO 210 - History of Western Music, Ancient to the Baroque  
      MUCO 330 - Music, Gender, and Sexuality  
      MUCO 380 - Music in World Cultures   

Nuclear Engineering
      NE 401 - Radiological Engineering Laboratory 
      NE 402 - Nuclear Engineering Laboratory 
      NE 427 - Honors: Nuclear Engineering Laboratory  

Nursing
      NURS 494 - Portfolio Development for the Registered Nurse  

Philosophy
      PHIL 252 - Contemporary Moral Problems 
      PHIL 320 - Ancient Western Philosophy 
      PHIL 322 - Medieval Philosophy 
      PHIL 324 - 17th- and 18th-Century Philosophy 
      PHIL 326 - Topics in 19th- and 20th-Century Philosophy 
      PHIL 327 - Honors: Ancient Western Philosophy 
      PHIL 328 - Honors: 17th- and 18th-Century Philosophy 
      PHIL 340 - Ethical Theory 
      PHIL 345 - Bioethics 
      PHIL 346 - Environmental Ethics      
      PHIL 347 - Honors: Ethical Theory 
      PHIL 348 - Honors: Environmental Ethics 
      PHIL 382 - Philosophy of Feminism 
      PHIL 390 - Philosophical Foundations of Democracy   
      PHIL 391 - Social and Political Philosophy   

Plant Sciences
      PLSC 410 - Nursery Management and Production 
      PLSC 491 - International Study: History and Culture of International Gardens and Landscapes  

Political Science
      POLS 311 - Contemporary Issues in American Public Policy  
      POLS 312 - Popular Culture and American Politics  

Psychology
      PSYC 400 - Advanced Cognitive Psychology  
      PSYC 415 - Psychology of Religion  
      PSYC 434 - Psychology of Gender  
      PSYC 481 - Intimate Partner Violence  
      PSYC 485 - Special Topics in Psychology  

Religious Studies
      REST 413 - Seminar in Early Judaism  
      REST 423 - Seminar in Early Christianity 
      REST 479 - Seminar in East Asian Religions  

Retail and Consumer Sciences
      RCS 391 - Leadership in Retailing  

Russian
      RUSS 221 - Rebels, Dreamers, and Fools: The Outcast in 19th Century Russian Literature  
      RUSS 222 - Heaven or Hell: Utopias and Dystopias in 20th-Century Russian Literature  
      RUSS 321 - Anton Chekhov: Russia's Bridge to the 20th Century  
      RUSS 322 - Dostoevsky, Terror, and Pan-Slavic Utopia  
      RUSS 421 - Philosophy Through Art: Leo Tolstoy's Explanations of Life's Meaning  

Science Education
      SCED 432 - Knowing and Learning in Mathematics and Science  

Social Work
      SOWK 314 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment 
      SOWK 317 - Honors: Human Behavior in the Social Environment   

Sociology
      SOCI 260 - Introduction to the Study of Environmental Issues 
      SOCI 495 - Social Justice and Community Service  

Theatre
      THEA 300 - Play Analysis   

University Honors
      UNHO 258 - Honors: Special Topics in the Arts and Humanities 
      UNHO 268 - Honors: Special Topics in the Social Sciences 
      UNHO 278 - Honors: Special Topics in Cultures and Civilizations 
      UNHO 288 - Honors: Special Topics in the Natural Sciences  

Women, Gender, and Sexuality
      WGS 330 - Gender and Music 
      WGS 370 - Gender and Globalization  
      WGS 382 - Philosophy of Feminism  

II. Communicating Orally (OC) (1 course)


Good oral communications skills enable students to interact successfully with others, share ideas, and present and explain discoveries – all skills that are necessary not only for professional success but also for personal fulfillment. Students should be able to speak in an informative and/or convincing manner to other individuals and to groups, both small and large. Students should be able to locate relevant information, evaluate its usefulness and quality, and incorporate the information logically and ethically in oral communication.

Courses in this area are expected to produce the following outcomes for students:

  1. Students will demonstrate the ability to speak clearly and effectively.
  2. Students will demonstrate the ability to locate and use relevant, credible evidence to support ideas.
  3. Students will demonstrate the ability to present oral information effectively to different audiences, shaping message, organization, language choices, and delivery techniques to correspond with purpose and rhetorical context.

This requirement may be completed by either of the following:

  1. Taking Communication Studies (CMST) - CMST 210  or CMST 240  (or honors equivalents, CMST 217  or CMST 247 ).

       or

  1. Taking a course with an OC designation.

Approved Communicating Orally (OC) Courses

Aerospace Engineering
      AE 410 - Professional Topics   

Agricultural Leadership, Education and Communications
      ALEC 240 - Presentation and Sales Strategies for Agricultural Audiences  

Animal Science
      ANSC 360 - Equine and Food Animal Evaluation  

Art Design/Graphic
      ARTD 452 - Graphic Design Capstone  

Biochemistry and Cellular and Molecular Biology
    
  BCMB 455 - Scientific Communication  

Biomedical Engineering
      BME 410 - Professional Topics  

Biosystems Engineering
      BSE 404 - Engineering Project Management  

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
      CBE 488 - Honors: Design Internship in Green Engineering  
      CBE 490 - Process Design and Economic Analysis  

Chemistry
      CHEM 406 - Senior Seminar   

Child and Family Studies
      CFS 405 - Development of Professional Skills   

Civil Engineering
      CE 205 - Professional Development I  

Computer Science
      COSC 402 - Senior Design Practicum  

Design
      DSGN 130 - Basic Design Thinking and Innovation  

Electrical and Computer Engineering
      ECE 402 - Senior Design Practicum  

Environmental and Soil Sciences
      ESS 301 - Professional Development  

Industrial Engineering
      IE 422 - Industrial Engineering Design II   

Materials Science and Engineering
      MSE 489 - Materials Design  

Mechanical Engineering
      ME 410 - Professional Topics  

Microbiology
      MICR 495 - Senior Seminar: Perspectives in Microbiology  

Nuclear Engineering
      NE 400 - Senior Seminar  

Nursing
      NURS 454 - Professional Leadership Issues 
      NURS 455 - Nursing Leadership and Management Dimensions  

Philosophy
      PHIL 244 - Professional Responsibility  

Physics
      PHYS 451 - A Survey of Contemporary Physics  

III. Quantitative Reasoning (QR) (2 courses)


Quantitative and statistical evidence and mathematical and logical reasoning often play critical roles in building arguments and claims to support opinions and actions. Students should therefore possess the mathematical and quantitative skills needed to evaluate such arguments and claims. Students should be able to recognize the quantitative dimensions of questions and issues they will encounter in their professional and personal lives. They also should be able to use mathematical and logical reasoning to formulate and solve problems.

Courses in this area are expected to produce the following outcomes for students:

  1. Students will demonstrate the ability to identify those aspects of arguments and claims that rely on quantitative evidence and on mathematical or logical reasoning.
  2. Students will demonstrate the ability to evaluate the appropriateness of conclusions drawn from quantitative evidence and mathematical or logical reasoning techniques.
  3. Students will demonstrate the ability to formulate and solve problems that rely on mathematical or logical reasoning.

This requirement may be completed by either of the following.

  1. Taking two mathematics or statistics courses from the list below. (Preferably, these courses would be taken in one of the following pairings: MATH 113  and MATH 115 ; MATH 123  and MATH 125 ; MATH 141  and MATH 142 ; MATH 147  and MATH 148 ; MATH 151  and MATH 152 ; MATH 125 , MATH 141  or MATH 147  and STAT 201  or STAT 207 ; MATH 115  and MATH 123  or MATH 125  or MATH 202 .)
    or
  2. Taking one mathematics course from the list below and one course designated in the undergraduate catalog as having a quantitative component (QR). The course designated as having a quantitative component may be within the student's major or an elective.

Mathematics
      MATH 113 - Mathematical Reasoning  
      MATH 115 - Statistical Reasoning  
      MATH 117 - Honors: Mathematical Reasoning  
      MATH 123 - Finite Mathematics  
      MATH 125 - Basic Calculus  
      MATH 141 - Calculus I  
      MATH 142 - Calculus II  
      MATH 147 - Honors: Calculus I  
      MATH 148 - Honors: Calculus II  
      MATH 151 - Mathematics for the Life Sciences I  
      MATH 152 - Mathematics for the Life Sciences II  
      MATH 202 - Probability, Statistics, and Euclidean Geometry  

Statistics
      STAT 201 - Introduction to Statistics  
      STAT 207 - Honors: Introduction to Statistics  

Approved Quantitative Reasoning (QR) Courses

Architecture
      ARCH 431 - Integration of Building Systems in Design  

Computer Science
      COSC 100 - Introduction to Computers and Computing  

Interior Architecture
      IARC 460 - Lighting for Interior Architecture   

Music Technology
      MUTC 290 - Sound Recording Techniques  

Philosophy
      PHIL 130 - Critical Thinking 
      PHIL 235 - Formal Logic  

Psychology
      PSYC 385 - Statistics in Psychology  

B. For Developing Broadened Perspectives


I. Arts and Humanities (AH) (2 courses)


"What does it mean to be human?" In attempting to answer this question, people have produced—and continue to produce—culturally and historically significant works. The study and critical interpretation of such works and their creators not only enriches students' lives but also helps students understand their own and others' answers to this enduring question.

Courses in this area are expected to produce the following outcomes for students:

  1. Students will demonstrate the ability to identify and describe prominent works, figures, and/or schools of thought in the arts and humanities.
  2. Students will demonstrate the ability to describe the cultural and historical significance of prominent works, figures, and/or schools of thought in the arts and humanities.
  3. Students will demonstrate the ability to critically interpret prominent works or accomplishments in artistic and humanistic fields.

This requirement is satisfied by taking two courses from the approved AH list.

Approved Arts and Humanities (AH) Courses

Africana Studies
      AFST 160 - Art of Africa, Oceania, and Pre-Columbian America 
      AFST 225 - Introduction to African Literature  
      AFST 226 - Introduction to Caribbean Literature  
      AFST 233 - Major Black Writers  

Architecture
      ARCH 111 - Architecture and the Built Environment 
      ARCH 117 - Honors: Architecture and the Built Environment  
      ARCH 211 - History and Theory of Architecture I 
      ARCH 212 - History and Theory of Architecture II  
      ARCH 217 - Honors: History and Theory of Architecture I  
      ARCH 218 - Honors: History and Theory of Architecture II  

Art Design/Graphic
      ARTD 150 - The Idea of Graphic Design  

Art History
      ARTH 162 - Art of Africa, Oceania, and Pre-Columbian America  
      ARTH 167 - Honors: Art of Africa, Oceania, and Pre-Columbian America 
      ARTH 172 - Western Art: Ancient through Medieval 
      ARTH 173 - Western Art: Renaissance to Contemporary 
      ARTH 177 - Honors Western Art: Ancient through Medieval 
      ARTH 178 - Honors Western Art: Renaissance to Contemporary 
      ARTH 183 - Asian Art 
      ARTH 187 - Honors: Asian Art  

Cinema Studies
      CNST 281 - Introduction to Film Studies  

Classics
      CLAS 221 - Early Greek Mythology 
      CLAS 222 - Classical Greek and Roman Mythology  
      CLAS 232 - Archaeology and Art of Ancient Greece and Rome  
      CLAS 253 - Greek and Roman Literature in English Translation   
      CLAS 254 - Greek and Roman Epic in English Translation  
      CLAS 255 - Greek and Roman Drama in English Translation  

English
      ENGL 201 - British Literature I: Beowulf through Johnson  
      ENGL 202 - British Literature II: Wordsworth to the Present 
      ENGL 206 - Introduction to Shakespeare 
      ENGL 207 - Honors: British Literature I  
      ENGL 208 - Honors: British Literature II 
      ENGL 221 - World Literature I: Ancient through Early Modern 
      ENGL 222 - World Literature II: The Eighteenth-Century to the Present 
      ENGL 225 - Introduction to African Literature 
      ENGL 226 - Introduction to Caribbean Literature 
      ENGL 231 - American Literature I: Colonial Era to the Civil War 
      ENGL 232 - American Literature II: Civil War to the Present 
      ENGL 233 - Major Black Writers  
      ENGL 237 - Honors: American Literature I: Colonial Era to the Civil War 
      ENGL 238 - Honors: American Literature II: Civil War to the Present 
      ENGL 247 - Honors: Introduction to Poetry 
      ENGL 248 - Honors: Introduction to Drama 
      ENGL 251 - Introduction to Poetry 
      ENGL 252 - Introduction to Drama 
      ENGL 253 - Introduction to Fiction  
      ENGL 254 - Themes in Literature  
      ENGL 258 - Honors: Introduction to Fiction 
      ENGL 281 - Introduction to Film Studies  

Haslam Scholars Program
      HSP 258 - Foundations of Modernity  
      HSP 287 - Knowledge:  

Musicology
      MUCO 110 - Introduction to Music in Western Culture  
      MUCO 115 - Music in the United States 
      MUCO 120 - History of Rock  
      MUCO 125 - Jazz in American Culture  
      MUCO 210 - History of Western Music, Ancient to the Baroque 
      MUCO 220 - History of Western Music, Classical to the Present  
      MUCO 290 - Soundscapes: Exploring Music in a Changing World  

Philosophy
      PHIL 101 - Introduction to Philosophy  
      PHIL 107 - Honors: Introduction to Philosophy  
      PHIL 200 - Special Topics 
      PHIL 244 - Professional Responsibility  
      PHIL 252 - Contemporary Moral Problems  

Religious Studies
      REST 225 - Introduction to Judaism, Christianity, Islam 
      REST 227 - Honors: Introduction to Judaism, Christianity, Islam  
      REST 280 - Introduction to the Religions of Asia  

Russian
      RUSS 221 - Rebels, Dreamers, and Fools: The Outcast in 19th Century Russian Literature 
      RUSS 222 - Heaven or Hell: Utopias and Dystopias in 20th-Century Russian Literature  

Theatre
      THEA 100 - Introduction to Theatre 
      THEA 107 - Honors: Introduction to Theatre  

University Honors
      UNHO 257 - Honors: Special Topics in the Arts and Humanities 
      UNHO 258 - Honors: Special Topics in the Arts and Humanities  

II. Cultures and Civilizations (CC) (2 courses)


Deepening understanding of one's own cultures and traditions requires stepping back to see how and why individuals and societies are both similar and different. Contextualizing beliefs about global events, ideas, and social practices provides students with the tools they need to understand historical, social, linguistic, and/or cultural similarities and differences.

Courses in this area are expected to produce the following outcome for students:

  1. Students will demonstrate understanding of appropriate disciplinary vocabulary, or competency in reading and speaking a language other than English.
  2. Students will demonstrate the ability to identify those aspects of social and cultural behaviors and ideas that change and those that stay the same across different times and places.

This requirement may be satisfied in one of the following ways:

  1. Taking two courses from the following CC list.
    or
  2. Taking a two-course sequence in a foreign language at the intermediate level.
    or
  3. Taking a six-hour intensive foreign language course at the intermediate level.

Approved Cultures and Civilizations (CC) Courses

Africana Studies
      AFST 235 - Introduction to African Studies  
      AFST 236 - Introduction to African Studies  

Anthropology
      ANTH 120 - Prehistoric Archaeology  
      ANTH 127 - Honors: Prehistoric Archaeology  

Classics
      CLAS 201 - Introduction to Classical Civilization  

Cultural Studies in Education
      CSE 200 - Survey of International Education  

Environmental and Soil Sciences
      ESS 120 - Soils and Civilizations  
      ESS 220 - Waters and Civilizations  
      ESS 227 - Honors: Waters and Civilizations  

Food Science
      FDSC 150 - History and Culture of Food  

Global Studies
      GLBS 250 - Introduction to Global Studies  

History
      HIEU 241 - Development of Western Civilization 
      HIEU 242 - Development of Western Civilization 
      HIEU 247 - Honors: Development of Western Civilization  
      HIEU 248 - Honors: Development of Western Civilization  
      HILA 255 - Early Latin American and Caribbean History 
      HILA 256 - Modern Latin American and Caribbean History 
      HIST 261 - A History of World Civilization 
      HIST 262 - A History of World Civilization  
      HIST 267 - Honors: A History of World Civilization  
      HIST 268 - Honors: A History of World Civilization  

Haslam Scholars Program
      HSP 368 - Study Abroad: Edinburgh, Scotland  

Latin American and Caribbean Studies
      LAC 251 - Early Latin American and Caribbean History 
      LAC 252 - Modern Latin American and Caribbean History  

Medieval and Renaissance Studies
      MRST 201 - Medieval Civilization I  
      MRST 202 - Medieval Civilization II  

Modern Foreign Languages and Literatures
      MFLL 200 - Topics in International Literatures and Cultures  

Plant Sciences
      PLSC 115 - Plants That Changed the World 
      PLSC 491 - International Study: History and Culture of International Gardens and Landscapes  

Religious Studies
      REST 101 - World Religions in History  
      REST 102 - The Comparison of World Religions       

Sociology
      SOCI 250 - Introduction to Global Studies  

University Honors
      UNHO 277 - Honors: Special Topics in Cultures and Civilizations 
      UNHO 278 - Honors: Special Topics in Cultures and Civilizations  

INTERMEDIATE FOREIGN LANGUAGE SEQUENCES


Some Colleges, such as Arts and Sciences and Business Administration, may require specific foreign language courses to fulfill this requirement (see Note 2). Students should consult their academic advisor before selecting language courses.

American Sign Language
      ASL 211 - Intermediate American Sign Language I 
      ASL 212 - Intermediate American Sign Language II  

Arabic
      ARAB 221 - Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic I 
      ARAB 222 - Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic II  

Asian Studies
      ASST 261 - Intermediate Persian I 
      ASST 262 - Intermediate Persian II  

Chinese
      CHIN 231 - Intermediate Chinese I 
      CHIN 232 - Intermediate Chinese II  

Classics
      CLAS 251 - Intermediate Latin I  
      CLAS 252 - Intermediate Latin II 
      CLAS 261 - Intermediate Greek: Grammar Review and Readings  
      CLAS 264 - Intermediate Greek: Epic Poetry  

French
      FREN 211 - Intermediate French I 
      FREN 212 - Intermediate French II 
      FREN 217 - Honors: Intermediate French I 
      FREN 218 - Honors: Intermediate French II  

German
      GERM 211 - Intermediate German I  
      GERM 212 - Intermediate German II  

Hebrew
      HEBR 241 - Intermediate Modern Hebrew I 
      HEBR 242 - Intermediate Modern Hebrew II  

Italian
      ITAL 211 - Intermediate Italian 
      ITAL 212 - Intermediate Italian  

Japanese
      JAPA 251 - Intermediate Japanese I 
      JAPA 252 - Intermediate Japanese II  

Persian
      PERS 261 - Intermediate Persian I  
      PERS 262 - Intermediate Persian II  

Portuguese
      PORT 211 - Intermediate Portuguese 
      PORT 212 - Intermediate Portuguese  

Religious Studies
      REST 221 - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew I 
      REST 222 - Intermediate Biblical Hebrew II  

Russian
      RUSS 201 - Intermediate Russian 
      RUSS 202 - Intermediate Russian  

Spanish
      SPAN 211 - Intermediate Spanish I 
      SPAN 212 - Intermediate Spanish II  
      SPAN 217 - Honors: Intermediate Spanish I  
      SPAN 218 - Honors: Intermediate Spanish II  

INTENSIVE INTERMEDIATE FOREIGN LANGUAGE COURSES


French
      FREN 223 - Intensive Intermediate French  

German
      GERM 223 - Intensive Intermediate German  

Italian
      ITAL 223 - Intensive Intermediate Italian  

Portuguese
      PORT 223 - Intensive Intermediate Portuguese  

Spanish
      SPAN 223 - Intensive Intermediate Spanish  

III. Natural Sciences (NS) (2 courses)


Over time, advances in science and technology have shaped our understanding of the world and our place in it. All students should be familiar with the fundamental principles and chief discoveries of one or more scientific disciplines, the role and relevance of science in contemporary society, and should be able to use scientific knowledge and methods to answer questions about natural phenomena and analyze contemporary issues.

Courses in this area are expected to produce the following outcomes for students:

  1. Students will demonstrate the ability to describe fundamental principles and chief discoveries through appropriate use of the basic vocabulary of a course's discipline.
  2. Students will demonstrate the ability to identify the scientific dimensions of contemporary issues.
  3. Students will demonstrate the ability to use experimental techniques to answer questions and test hypotheses.

This requirement is satisfied by taking two courses from the approved NS list. At least one of the courses must have a laboratory.

Approved Natural Sciences (NS) Courses († Non-Lab Courses)

Anthropology
      ANTH 110 - Human Origins  †
      ANTH 117 - Honors: Human Origins  † 

Astronomy
      ASTR 151 - A Journey through the Solar System Lecture   †
      ASTR 152 - Stars, Galaxies, and Cosmology Lecture   †
      ASTR 153 - A Journey through the Solar System Lab       
      ASTR 154 - Stars, Galaxies, and Cosmology Lab 
      ASTR 217 - Honors: Introductory Astronomy 
      ASTR 218 - Honors: Introductory Astronomy  

*NOTE: Students may take ASTR 151 -ASTR 153  or ASTR 152 -ASTR 154  for natural science with lab credit.

Biology
      BIOL 101 - Introduction to Biology: Cells, Genetics, and Physiology  
      BIOL 102 - Introduction to Biology: Biodiversity and Ecology  
      BIOL 105 - Parasites, Pathogens, and Pandemics: Infectious Disease and Society  †
      BIOL 106 - The Living City  †
      BIOL 113 - Introductory Plant Biology I  †
      BIOL 114 - Introductory Plant Biology II  †
      BIOL 115 - Introductory Plant Biology Laboratory  (Lab if taken with 113 or 114.)
      BIOL 150 - Organismal and Ecological Biology   †
      BIOL 158 - Honors: Organismal and Ecological Biology  †
      BIOL 159 - Skills of Biological Investigation 
      BIOL 160 - Cellular and Molecular Biology 
      BIOL 167 - Honors: Skills of Biological Investigation  

      BIOL 168 - Honors: Cellular and Molecular Biology  †

*NOTE: Students may take BIOL 150 -BIOL 159 , BIOL 160 -BIOL 159 , BIOL 158 -BIOL 167 , or BIOL 168 -BIOL 159  for natural science with lab credit.

Chemistry
      CHEM 100 - Principles of Chemistry 
      CHEM 110 - Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry  
      CHEM 120 - General Chemistry I  
      CHEM 128 - Honors: General Chemistry I 
      CHEM 130 - General Chemistry II       
      CHEM 138 - Honors: General Chemistry II  

Engineering Fundamentals
      EF 151 - Physics for Engineers I 
      EF 152 - Physics for Engineers II 
      EF 157 - Honors: Physics for Engineers I 
      EF 158 - Honors: Physics for Engineers II  

Entomology and Plant Pathology
      EPP 201 - Impact of Insects and Plant Diseases on Human Societies  †

Environmental and Soil Sciences
      ESS 110 - Energy for the World  †

Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries
      FWF 250 - Conservation  †

Geography
      GEOG 131 - Weather, Climate, and Climate Change 
      GEOG 132 - Landscapes and Environmental Change  
      GEOG 137 - Honors: Weather, Climate, and Climate Change  
      GEOG 200 - Environmental Issues in National Parks  †

Geology
      GEOL 101 - The Dynamic Earth 
      GEOL 102 - Earth, Life, and Time  
      GEOL 103 - The Earth's Environments  
      GEOL 104 - Exploring the Planets  
      GEOL 107 - Honors: The Dynamic Earth 
      GEOL 108 - Honors: Earth, Life, and Time  
      GEOL 201 - Biodiversity: Past, Present, and Future   †
      GEOL 202 - Earth as an Ecosystem: Modern Problems and Solutions   †
      GEOL 202S - Earth as an Ecosystem: Modern Problems and Solutions   †
      GEOL 203 - Geology of National Parks  †
      GEOL 205 - Age of the Dinosaurs  †
      GEOL 207 - Honors: Age of the Dinosaurs   †
      GEOL 208 - Honors: Earth as an Ecosystem: Modern Problems and Solutions  †

Haslam Scholars Program
      HSP 267 - Life:  
      HSP 288 - Energy in the Modern World  

Microbiology
      MICR 210 - Allied Health Microbiology  

Nutrition
      NUTR 100 - Introductory Nutrition   †

Physics
      PHYS 101 - How Things Work I   †
      PHYS 102 - How Things Work II   †
      PHYS 135 - Introduction to Physics for Physical Science and Mathematics Majors I 
      PHYS 136 - Introduction to Physics for Physical Science and Mathematics Majors II 
      PHYS 137 - Honors: Fundamentals of Physics for Physics Majors I 
      PHYS 138 - Honors: Fundamentals of Physics for Physics Majors II 
      PHYS 161 - Elements of Physics for Architects and Interior Design Students  †
      PHYS 221 - Elements of Physics 
      PHYS 222 - Elements of Physics  
      PHYS 231 - Fundamentals of Physics: Electricity and Magnetism 
      PHYS 232 - Fundamentals of Physics: Wave Motion, Optics, and Modern Physics  

Plant Sciences
      PLSC 250 - World Food and Fiber Plant Production  †

University Honors
      UNHO 287 - Honors: Special Topics in the Natural Sciences  †
      UNHO 288 - Honors: Special Topics in the Natural Sciences  †

IV. Social Sciences (SS) (2 courses)


Why do people – individually and collectively – do what they do? Answering this question allows us to better understand ourselves, make better decisions, and promote the health and success of individuals and groups. The ability to answer this question requires gaining knowledge about individual and group behavior and political and social systems, as well as understanding the methods by which social scientists collect, create, and evaluate such knowledge.

Courses in this area are expected to produce the following outcomes for students:

  1. Students will identify and critique claims about human behavior and the dynamics of individual, political, and social issues.
  2. Students will demonstrate knowledge of appropriate and ethical methods, technologies, and data that social scientists use to investigate and describe the human condition.

This requirement is satisfied by taking two courses from the approved SS list.

Approved Social Sciences (SS) Courses

Africana Studies
      AFST 201 - Introduction to African American Studies 
      AFST 202 - Introduction to African American Studies  

Agricultural and Resource Economics
      AREC 201 - Economics of the Global Food and Fiber System  

Agriculture and Natural Resources
      AGNR 180 - Global Dynamics: Food, Biodiversity, and the Environment  

Anthropology
      ANTH 130 - Cultural Anthropology 
      ANTH 137 - Honors: Cultural Anthropology  

Baker Center for Public Policy
      BCPP 101 - Introduction to Public Policy  

Child and Family Studies
      CFS 210 - Human Development 
      CFS 220 - Marriage and Family: Roles and Relationships  

Economics
      ECON 201 - Introductory Economics: A Survey Course  
      ECON 207 - Honors: Introductory Economics  
      ECON 211 - Principles of Microeconomics  
      ECON 213 - Principles of Macroeconomics  
      ECON 217 - Honors: Principles of Microeconomics  
      ECON 218 - Honors: Principles of Macroeconomics  

Educational Psychology
      EDPY 210 - Psychoeducational Issues in Human Development  

Geography
      GEOG 101 - World Geography 
      GEOG 111 - Our Digital Earth 
      GEOG 121 - Human Geography: People and Places  

Haslam Scholars Program
      HSP 257 - Power:  
      HSP 268 - Perspectives on Globalization  

Interior Architecture
      IARC 200 - Human-Environment Relations  
      IARC 207 - Honors: Human-Environment Relations  

Political Science
      POLS 101 - United States Government and Politics 
      POLS 102 - Introduction to Political Science 
      POLS 107 - Honors: United States Government and Politics  

Psychology
      PSYC 110 - General Psychology 
      PSYC 117 - Honors: General Psychology  

Religious Studies
      REST 232 - Religions in Global Perspective 
      REST 233 - Religion and Society in North America  

Social Work
      SOWK 250 - Introduction to Social Welfare  

Sociology
      SOCI 110 - Social Problems and Social Justice  
      SOCI 120 - Introduction to Sociology  
      SOCI 127 - Honors: Introduction to Sociology  
      SOCI 232 - Religions in Global Perspective   

University Honors
      UNHO 267 - Honors: Special Topics in the Social Sciences 
      UNHO 268 - Honors: Special Topics in the Social Sciences  

Women, Gender, and Sexuality
      WGS 200 - Introduction to Women, Gender, and Sexuality   

Notes


  1. Some courses on the various General Education course lists may have prerequisites. Students are responsible for meeting all course prerequisites.
  2. A student's college/program may require specific General Education courses.
  3. General Education courses must be taken for a letter grade (i.e., A-F) rather than Satisfactory/No Credit (unless this is the only way the course is offered).
  4. The Office of Disability Services (ODS) is committed to providing equal opportunities for students with disabilities at the University of Tennessee. Appropriate accommodations will be made to enable persons with disabilities to satisfy the General Education requirements. Students with documented disabilities should contact the Office of Disability Services for assistance with appropriate accommodations at (865) 974-6087 or ods@tennessee.edu.
  5. Subcommittees of the Undergraduate Council General Education Committee are charged with management of the courses to be included on the General Education course lists for the Basic Skills and Broadened Perspectives areas.