2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
    Jun 05, 2020  
2018-2019 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


General Education Designations

Registration Notes

Academic Disciplines Chart

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 18-19 Academic Disciplines Chart  

 

(ENGL) English (339)

  
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    ENGL 412 - Literature of the Later 18th Century: Johnson to Burns

    3 Credit Hours
    Survey of English literature and culture from 1745 to 1800.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 413 - Restoration and 18th-Century Genres and Modes

    3 Credit Hours
    Study of one major genre or literary mode such as drama, novel, poetry, nonfiction, prose, satire, romance, or epic written between 1660 and 1800.

    Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 414 - Romantic Poetry and Prose I

    3 Credit Hours
    Emphasis on Wordsworth, Coleridge, and Blake with readings from Lamb, De Quincey, and other prose writers.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 415 - Romantic Poetry and Prose II

    3 Credit Hours
    Emphasis on Keats, Shelley, and Byron with readings from Hazlitt, Peacock, and other prose writers.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 419 - Later Victorian Literature

    3 Credit Hours
    May include poetry by the Pre-Raphaelites, Arnold, Hopkins, and Hardy; prose by Arnold, Ruskin, and Carroll; plays by Gilbert and Wilde.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 420 - The 19th-Century British Novel

    3 Credit Hours
    Major novelists from Scott to Hardy.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 421 - Modern British Novel

    3 Credit Hours
    Authors such as Joyce and Woolf through contemporary British fiction writers.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 422 - Women Writers in Britain

    3 Credit Hours
    Emphasis on the literary consciousness and works of women writers in Britain. Course content will vary. Authors covered may include Marie de France, Margery Kempe, Aemilia Lanyer, Elizabeth Cary, Aphra Behn, Frances Burney, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Shelley, George Eliot, Virginia Woolf, and Doris Lessing. Writing-emphasis course.

    (Same as Women, Gender, and Sexuality 422.)
    Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 423 - Colonial and Post-Colonial Literature

    3 Credit Hours
    Emphasis on historical and theoretical methodologies for reading colonial and post-colonial literature.

    Repeatability: May be repeated with consent of instructor. Maximum 6 hours.
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 424 - Jane Austen

    3 Credit Hours
    Close study of Austen’s literary works, with special attention to their cultural and literary contexts.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 431 - Early American Literature

    3 Credit Hours
    From the earliest texts to 1830, including exploration and discovery, Native American, colonial, revolutionary, and early national works.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 432 - American Romanticism and Transcendentalism

    3 Credit Hours
    Prose and poetry of the American Renaissance from 1830 to the end of the Civil War. Includes writers such as Cooper, Emerson, Fuller, Poe, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Douglass, Jacobs, Whitman, and Dickinson.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 433 - American Realism and Naturalism

    3 Credit Hours
    Literature from the time of the Civil War to World War I. Includes writers such as Alcott, Twain, Howells, James, Jewett, Harper, Crane, Norris, and Wharton.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 434 - Modern American Literature

    3 Credit Hours
    World War I to the present.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 435 - American Fiction to 1900

    3 Credit Hours
    Explores the development of American novels and short fiction published between the Revolutionary era and the end of the nineteenth century. Includes such writers as Rowson, Cooper, Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, James, Twain, and Chesnutt.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 436 - Modern American Novel

    3 Credit Hours
    Authors such as Faulkner, Steinbeck, and Welty.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 441 - Southern Literature

    3 Credit Hours
    Southern writing from colonial period into the 20th century, including frontier humorists, local color writers, and the Southern Literary Renaissance.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 442 - American Humor

    3 Credit Hours
    Development of American humor from the early 19th century into the 20th century with particular emphasis on Mark Twain.

    (Same as American Studies 442.)
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 443 - Topics in Black Literature

    3 Credit Hours
    Content varies according to particular genres, authors, or theories from 1845 to the present, including Langston Hughes and the Harlem Renaissance, Richard Wright and Gwendolyn Brooks, writing by black women, international black literature in English, and black American autobiography.

    (Same as Africana Studies 443.)
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 444 - Appalachian Literature and Culture

    3 Credit Hours
    Appalachian literature in the context of parallel developments in art, music, and cultural history.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 451 - Modern British and American Poetry

    3 Credit Hours
    Formal, cultural, and thematic movements in 20th-century British and American poetry published before 1950. Includes writers such as Yeats, Frost, Eliot, Pound, Williams, Moore, Stevens, Stein, Hughes, and Auden.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 452 - Modern Drama

    3 Credit Hours
    Survey of British, American, and international drama from 1880 to the end of World War II. Includes such playwrights as Ibsen, Chekhov, Shaw, Synge, O’Neill, Glaspell, Treadwell, Hughes, Pirandello, Brecht, and Wilder.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 453 - Contemporary Drama

    3 Credit Hours
    Survey of British, American, and international drama since World War II. Includes such playwrights as Williams, Miller, Beckett, Dürrenmatt, Stoppard, Churchill, Shepard, Mamet, Shange, Wilson, Friel, Maponya, Highway, and Kushner.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 454 - 20th-Century International Novel

    3 Credit Hours
    Fiction in English translation from such writers as Kafka and Camus through contemporary authors.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 455 - Persuasive Writing

    3 Credit Hours
    Focuses on writing and analyzing persuasive texts in public, private, and academic contexts.

    Satisfies General Education Requirement: (WC)
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 456 - Contemporary Fiction/Narrative

    3 Credit Hours
    Formal, literary-historical, and thematic movements in post-World War II British and American fiction and international fiction in translation. Focus on postmodern novels and short stories written after 1945, but readings may include some newly influential narrative forms such as the graphic novel, hypertext and digital fiction and the nonfiction novel.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 459 - Contemporary Poetry

    3 Credit Hours
    Formal, cultural, and thematic movements in poetry published since 1950. Includes such writers as Lowell, Bishop, Brooks, Ginsberg, Plath, Larkin, Ashbery, Heaney, Baraka, and Walcott.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 460 - Technical Editing

    3 Credit Hours
    Editing technical material for publication. Principles of style, format, graphics, layout, and production management.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 462 - Writing for Publication

    3 Credit Hours
    Principles and practices of writing for publication. Dissertations, theses, articles, and reports in science and technology.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 463 - Advanced Poetry Writing

    3 Credit Hours
    Development of skills acquired in basic poetry-writing course.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 363.
  
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    ENGL 464 - Advanced Fiction Writing

    3 Credit Hours
    Development of skills acquired in basic fiction-writing course.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 364.
  
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    ENGL 466 - Writing, Layout, and Production of Technical Documents

    3 Credit Hours
    Principles of design for desktop publishing. Production of various documents to be incorporated into a professional portfolio.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 470 - Special Topics in Rhetoric

    3 Credit Hours
    Topics vary.

    Repeatability: May be repeated with consent of department. Maximum 6 hours.
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 471 - Sociolinguistics

    3 Credit Hours
    Language in relation to societies. Theoretical and empirical study of language variation in individuals (style-shifting) and among social, cultural, and national/international groups.

    (Same as Linguistics 471.)
    Recommended Background: 371 or 372 or Linguistics 200 or consent of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 472 - American English

    3 Credit Hours
    Phonological, morphological, and syntactic characteristics of major social and regional varieties of American English with attention to their origins, functions, and implications for cultural pluralism.

    (Same as Linguistics 472.)
    Recommended Background: 371 or 372 or Linguistics 200 or consent of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 474 - Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language I

    3 Credit Hours
    Introduces major issues surrounding teaching ESL/EFL, including political implications of teaching ESL/EFL. Introduction to second language acquisition, learner variables in language learning, traditional and innovative approaches to ESL/EFL, and basic features of American English grammar necessary for teaching ESL.

    (Same as Linguistics 474.)
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
    Recommended Background: Second year of a foreign language.
  
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    ENGL 476 - Second Language Acquisition

    3 Credit Hours
    How humans learn second languages. Examines theoretical models and research on such issues as differences between first and second language acquisition; the effect of age; cognitive factors in second language acquisition; learner variables; sociocultural factors; and implications for second/foreign language instruction.

    (Same as Linguistics 476.)
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 477 - Pedagogical Grammar for ESL Teachers

    3 Credit Hours
    Aspects of English syntax and morphology presenting difficulties for non-native learners of English. Basic and complex sentence structures; the noun and article system; and verb tense, aspect, modality, and complementation.

    (Same as Linguistics 477.)
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 479 - Literary Criticism

    3 Credit Hours
    Historical survey of major works of literary criticism.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 480 - Fairy Tale, Legend, and Myth: Folk Narrative

    3 Credit Hours
    Study of forms of folk narrative. Normally includes Grimms’, Andersen’s, Irish, English, Appalachian, African, and Native American tales.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 481 - Studies in Folklore

    3 Credit Hours
    Topic varies.

    Repeatability: May be repeated if topic differs. Maximum 6 hours.
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 482 - Major Authors

    3 Credit Hours
    Concentrated study of at least one of the most influential writers in British or American literary history (e.g., Donne, Pope, Austen, Tennyson, Whitman, Faulkner, Lawrence, Baldwin, or Morrison). Content varies.

    Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 483 - Special Topics in Literature

    3 Credit Hours
    Topic varies.

    Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 484 - Special Topics in Writing

    3 Credit Hours
    Original writing integrated with reading. Usually taught by a professional author.

    Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 485 - Special Topics in Language

    3 Credit Hours
    (Same as Linguistics 485.)
    Repeatability: May be repeated with consent of department. Maximum 6 hours.
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 486 - Special Topics in Criticism

    3 Credit Hours
    Special topics in theoretical and practical approaches to British and American literature. Content varies.

    Repeatability: May be repeated with consent of department. Maximum 6 hours.
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 489 - Special Topics in Film

    3 Credit Hours
    Particular directors, film genres, national cinema movements, or other topics. Content varies.

    (Same as Cinema Studies 489.)
    Repeatability: May be repeated with consent of department. Maximum 6 hours.
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 490 - Language and Law

    3 Credit Hours
    Language in the Anglo-American legal process. Focus on differences between spoken and written language, lexical and syntactic ambiguity, pragmatics, speech act analysis, and the language rights of linguistic minorities.

    (Same as Linguistics 490.)
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 491 - Foreign Study: Drama in Stratford and London

    1-4 Credit Hours
    Seeing, studying, and writing about drama as performed in London and Stratford-upon-Avon during the summer.

    Repeatability: May be repeated once with instructor’s permission.
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 492 - Off-Campus Study: Drama in New York

    3 Credit Hours
    Seeing, studying, and writing about drama as performed in New York City.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 493 - Independent Study

    1-6 Credit Hours
    Tutorial in subjects not adequately covered in regular courses.

    Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
  
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    ENGL 494 - Cultural Rhetorics

    3 Credit Hours
    Rhetoric as cultural practice in connection with place, identity, and community. Focus on developing rhetorical understanding and theorizing through considerations that include language, constructions of the body, community, place, and material cultures.

    Satisfies General Education Requirement: (WC)
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
    Recommended Background: 355 or consent of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 495 - Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition

    3 Credit Hours
    Introduction to the historical, theoretical, and empirical modes of inquiry in rhetoric and composition and their implications for the teaching of composition.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 355.
  
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    ENGL 496 - The Rhetoric of Legal Discourse

    3 Credit Hours
    Nature of legal language and written discourse types (opinions, memoranda, briefs). Introduction to legal research resources and techniques. Issue identification and argumentative techniques. Students will write position papers, memoranda, and briefs. No prior legal knowledge necessary.

    Recommended Background: 355 or consent of instructor.
  
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    ENGL 497 - Honors: Senior Seminar

    3 Credit Hours
    English honors capstone experience. Enriched section of 499. Intensive study of an author, period, genre, or of problems in language, literary history, or theory. Content varies, but all sections address problems of value from an interdisciplinary perspective. Substantial research paper required.

    Satisfies General Education Requirement: (WC)
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 102, 118, 132, 290, or 298.
    Comment(s): Completion of 15 upper-division hours in English required.
    Registration Restriction(s): English major; 3.25 GPA.
  
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    ENGL 498 - Senior Honors Thesis

    3 Credit Hours
    Second semester of English honors program. Working individually, the student produces a substantial critical or creative project under the direction of two members of the professorial staff.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 398.

(ENT) Entrepreneurship

  
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    ENT 350 - Introduction to Entrepreneurship

    3 Credit Hours
    An introduction to entrepreneurship with an emphasis on identifying, evaluating, and developing new venture opportunities. Topics include opportunity identification and evaluation, start-up strategies, business valuation, business plan development, attracting stakeholders, financing the venture, managing the growing business, and exit strategies.

    Credit Restriction: Students may not receive credit for both 350 and Engineering Fundamentals 357.
    Registration Restriction(s): Minimum of 45 completed credit hours.
  
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    ENT 410 - Leadership in Nonprofits and Social Entrepreneurship

    3 Credit Hours
    Organizations pursuing goals for the benefit of society face a unique set of challenges compared to those with primarily for-profit goals. Though charged with vitally important missions, nonprofits and social ventures (for-profit businesses with a social mission) are too often poorly led and managed. This course develops business-minded thinking and useful leadership skills in the future leaders of organizations with societal and nonprofit missions.

    Registration Restriction(s): Minimum of 45 completed credit hours.
  
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    ENT 410S - Leadership in Nonprofits and Social Entrepreneurship

    3 Credit Hours
    This course introduces students to obstacles facing nonprofit organizations and start-ups, provides students the tools and concepts essential to address these obstacles, and challenges students to use these tools and their own value systems in making “real dollar” grants to local nonprofits. The pedagogy is a blend of case studies, online learning (a six-module MOOC from Stanford), and service-learning work. In the service-learning portion of the course, students evaluate proposals from area nonprofits and award grants provided by the Learning by Giving Foundation and local philanthropists. 

    Registration Restriction(s): Minimum of 45 completed credit hours.
  
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    ENT 415 - Start-Overs as Start-Ups

    3 Credit Hours
    Not all entrepreneurial activity takes place within the confines of a brand new organization. For some organizations, entrepreneurial effort is required as an organization “starts over” due to poor performance, changes in leadership, new ownership, generational handoff, and/or other factors. This course centers on those situations where existing organizations need to be entrepreneurially refreshed in order to realize their potential.

    Registration Restriction(s): Minimum of 45 completed credit hours.
  
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    ENT 420 - Entrepreneurial Finance

    3 Credit Hours
    Decision-making for financing startups; topics include the time value of money, financial statements and analysis, breakeven analysis, the cost of capital, cash budgeting, capital budgeting, and business valuation.

    Registration Restriction(s): Minimum of 45 completed credit hours.
  
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    ENT 425 - Entrepreneurial Marketing

    3 Credit Hours
    Entrepreneurial ventures face important and sometimes unique challenges marketing new products and/or services from new firms. New ventures must not only let consumers know that their products and/or services exist but also legitimize the venture in the minds of consumers. This course provides an in-depth look at entrepreneurial marketing strategies with an important focus on online presence and social media initiatives.

    Credit Restriction: Students cannot receive credit for both 425 and Marketing 350.
    Registration Restriction(s): Minimum of 45 completed credit hours.
  
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    ENT 451 - New Venture Planning

    3 Credit Hours
    Integration of various functional disciplines and their application to general management of new ventures within established companies and entrepreneurial enterprises. Focuses on the components necessary for the development of a business plan.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 350 with grade of C or better or Engineering Fundamentals 357.
    Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – junior.
  
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    ENT 460 - Leading Innovation and Change

    3 Credit Hours
    How managers identify and nurture new business opportunities while maintaining competitive advantage. Topics include examination of change models, the role of middle managers in large organizations, and ways to address resistance to change.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 350 with grade of C or better.
    Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – junior.
  
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    ENT 492 - Entrepreneurship Internship

    3 Credit Hours
    Integrates classroom knowledge with skill based competencies in entrepreneurship through first-hand experience working with an entrepreneur or with entrepreneurship-focused organizations.

    Registration Restriction(s): Minimum of 45 completed credit hours.
    Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.
  
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    ENT 492N - Entrepreneurship Internship

    3 Credit Hours
    Integrates classroom knowledge with skill based competencies in entrepreneurship through first-hand experience working with an entrepreneur and with entrepreneurship-focused organizations.

    Registration Restriction(s): Minimum of 45 completed credit hours.
    Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.
  
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    ENT 499 - Special Topics in Entrepreneurship

    3 Credit Hours
    Topics of current interest in entrepreneurship.

    Repeatability: May be repeated for credit with consent of department. Maximum 6 hours.
    Registration Restriction(s): Minimum of 45 completed credit hours.

(EPP) Entomology and Plant Pathology (341)

  
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    EPP 201 - Impact of Insects and Plant Diseases on Human Societies

    3 Credit Hours
    Insects and plant diseases have had a significant influence on human history, culture, and lifestyles. The science of entomology and plant pathology helps humankind understand the impact of insects and plant pathogens on these dimensions of human existence. The development of strategies to capitalize on the beneficial aspects of these organisms will also be explored.

    Satisfies General Education Requirement: (NS)
  
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    EPP 210 - Bugs: Bizarre, Beautiful, and Beneficial

    3 Credit Hours
    This course will introduce students to the diverse world of insects and the integral interactions between insects and humans. More than one million insect species have been described, with estimates ranging from 10 to 30 million species yet to be discovered. Scientists estimate that there are about 250 million insects for every human on earth and they comprise about 10% of the earth’s weight and represent ca. 80 to 85% of all life on earth! Fortunately, only a small percentage of all insects cause us grief, anguish, pain, and misery. The majority of them may be classified as bizarre, beautiful, or beneficial! This course will focus on the role of insects in our world, with an emphasis on their beneficial contributions to our quality of life.

  
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    EPP 313 - Introductory Plant Pathology

    3 Credit Hours
    Introduction to the microorganisms and environmental conditions causing disease in plants. Biology of pathogens, host-pathogen interactions, and disease development and principles of control.

    Contact Hour Distribution: 2 hours lecture and 1 lab.
  
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    EPP 321 - Introductory Entomology

    3 Credit Hours
    Structure, life history, habits, and principles of control of important insect pests of farm, garden, orchard, and household.

    Contact Hour Distribution: 2 hours and 1 lab.
  
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    EPP 410 - Diseases and Insects of Ornamental Plants

    3 Credit Hours
    Symptoms, identification, and management of diseases and insect pests that affect plants in greenhouse, nursery, and landscape environments.

  
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    EPP 411 - Forest Insects and Diseases

    3 Credit Hours
    Insects and pathogens associated with trees and shrubs will be identified and their impacts on host plants evaluated.

  
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    EPP 425 - Medical and Veterinary Entomology

    3 Credit Hours
    Identification, biology, and control of arthropods that are parasites of humans and animals. The course focuses on arthropods and their biology, life histories, habitats, hosts, and options for management. Review and discussion of sampling/monitoring methods and decision-making guidelines to managing vector-borne diseases is also addressed.

    Contact Hour Distribution: 2 hours lecture and 1 lab.
  
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    EPP 485 - Forensic Entomology and Crime Scene Investigations

    3 Credit Hours
    Objectively observe, record, and determine how insects and other arthropods contribute to the overall analysis of a death event or crime scene, e.g., homicide, child/elderly neglect investigations, food contamination, and other civil and criminal applications. Learn how to collect, preserve, and identify forensically important arthropods as well as estimate post-mortem interval. Learn how to prepare written reports of investigation, write an affidavit, learn the basics of crime scene processing, identify and classify forensically important insects, and present findings in a mock court room.

    Contact Hour Distribution: 2 hours lecture and 1 lab.
    (DE) Prerequisite(s): Twelve hours of biology (BIOL) and/or anthropology (ANTH), or consent of instructor.
  
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    EPP 493 - Independent Study in Entomology or Plant Pathology

    1-4 Credit Hours
    Laboratory, field, or library research in entomology, plant pathology, or integrated pest management under the guidance of a faculty member.

    Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
  
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    EPP 499 - Undergraduate Research

    1-3 Credit Hours
    Experience in research projects under supervision of faculty. Student should make arrangements for research project with faculty instructor prior to enrollment.

    Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 12 hours.
    Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.
  
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    EPP 499R - Undergraduate Research

    1-3 Credit Hours
    Experience in research projects under supervision of faculty. Student should make arrangements for research project with faculty instructor prior to enrollment.

    Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 12 hours.
    Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.

(ESS) Environmental and Soil Sciences (345)

  
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    ESS 110 - Energy for the World

    3 Credit Hours
    Energy is one of the basic units of our physical world, and its availability strongly defines a populace’s standard of living. Debates over the risks related to fracking, mining, nuclear power, hydroelectric dams, wind farms, solar farms, burning fossil fuels, and implications for climate change will be weighed against the need to deliver power to an increasing human population. In this course we will investigate how energy is derived from all the available technologies: from coal to tidal. This will include the full aspect of energy consumption including infrastructure, mining, energy storage, energy delivery, and waste disposal. As we discuss various countries and how they derive their energy, we will see that the proportion and the total amount of energy generated by the various technologies differ dramatically. Lastly we will discuss the inherent conflict generally between energy producers (generating self-wealth) and those downstream of the energy production (enduring poor environmental conditions), and how this conflict is becoming intergenerational.

    Satisfies General Education Requirement: (NS)
  
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    ESS 120 - Soils and Civilizations

    3 Credit Hours
    Investigation of the close linkage between soil conservation and degradation and the consequences to ancient civilizations and environmental degradation and its societal impacts during modern times. Comparison of past soil management practices to present-day issues of soil salinization, erosion, and siltation. Introduction to the role of soil resources in current global environmental issues and conflicts.

    Satisfies General Education Requirement: (CC)
  
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    ESS 210 - Introduction to Soil Science

    4 Credit Hours
    Differences in soils; soil genesis; and the physical, chemical, and biological properties of soil. Relation of soil to agricultural and environmental sustainability, land use, and pollution. Soil management relative to tillage, erosion, moisture supply, temperature, aeration, fertility, and plant nutrition.

    Contact Hour Distribution: 3 hours lecture and one 2-hour lab.
    (RE) Corequisite(s): Chemistry 100 or Chemistry 120 or Chemistry 128.
  
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    ESS 220 - Waters and Civilizations

    3 Credit Hours
    Investigation and discussion of the societal impacts on ancient and modern civilizations of water issues, including irrigation, flood control, droughts and desertification, dam construction, aquifers, drinking water, water pollution, and water rights.

    Satisfies General Education Requirement: (CC)
    Contact Hour Distribution: 3 hours lecture.
  
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    ESS 227 - Honors: Waters and Civilizations

    3 Credit Hours
    Honors version of 220 that requires an additional honors component.

    Satisfies General Education Requirement: (CC)
    Contact Hour Distribution: 3 hours lecture.
  
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    ESS 242 - Soil Morphology and Judging

    1 Credit Hours
    Intensive course involving describing, classifying, and interpreting soils in preparation for regional and national soil judging contests.

    Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
    Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.
  
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    ESS 301 - Professional Development

    1 Credit Hours
    Techniques of effective professional communications, professional ethics, interviewing, and the job search. Introduction of requirements for professional certification in various disciplines.

    Satisfies General Education Requirement: (OC)
    Registration Restriction(s): Environmental and soil science major or permission of instructor.
  
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    ESS 334 - Soil Nutrient Management and Fertilizers

    3 Credit Hours
    Influence of soil properties on nutrient availability to plants. Management of inorganic and organic fertilizer materials and the determination of their fate in the soil-plant system. Nutrient management as it relates to agricultural sustainability and soil quality.

    Contact Hour Distribution: 2 hours and 1 lab.
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 210.
  
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    ESS 424 - Environmental Stormwater Management

    3 Credit Hours
    Investigation of sustainability issues regarding control of the hydrologic cycle, with special emphases on hydrologic estimation, hydraulic design, and best management practices for control of stormwater and associated erosion and water quality issues.

    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 210.
  
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    ESS 434 - Environmental Soil Chemistry

    3 Credit Hours
    Composition and chemical properties of soils and processes that govern fate and behavior of chemicals in the soil environment. Topics include ― clay mineralogy; soil organic matter; mineral weathering and stability; aqueous speciation; surface chemistry, ion exchange, adsorption, and molecular retention; oxidation-reduction; and soil acidity, alkalinity, and salinity.

    Contact Hour Distribution: 2 hours lecture and 1 lab.
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): Chemistry 110 or Chemistry 260.
  
  •  

    ESS 442 - Soil Genesis and Classification

    3 Credit Hours
    Soil genesis and formation; observing and describing morphology of agricultural and forest soils; chemical and physical properties; and classification. Includes 3 weekend field trips.

    Contact Hour Distribution: 2 hours and 1 lab.
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 210.
  
  •  

    ESS 444 - Environmental Soil Physics

    3 Credit Hours
    Basic understanding of soil physical properties and processes; influence of soil physical properties on water and chemical movement in soil; and practical experience in the measurement and analysis of soil physical properties, water flow, and chemical movement in soil.

    Contact Hour Distribution: 2 hours lecture and 1 lab.
    Credit Restriction: Students cannot receive credit for both 444 and 544.
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 210 and Physics 221.
  
  •  

    ESS 454 - Environmental Soil Biology

    3 Credit Hours
    Biology and biochemistry of the soil environment as they apply to environmental and agricultural processes and sustainability. Topics include the soil habitat, microbial ecology and diversity, biogeochemical cycling of nutrients, biodegradation, and research methodology to investigate soil microorganisms.

    Credit Restriction: Students cannot receive credit for both 454 and 554.
    (RE) Prerequisite(s): 210.
  
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    ESS 462 - Environmental Climatology

    3 Credit Hours
    Study of global energy budget, past climates, climate variability, climate distribution, and climate change. Emphasis on global warming and its potential impacts on ecosystems, societies, and global sustainability. Students are required to use quantitative, computer, and problem-solving skills to analyze and report climate data for environmental planning.

    Recommended Background: Computer proficiency.
  
  •  

    ESS 492 - Internship

    1-6 Credit Hours
    Supervised experience with a departmentally-approved employer. Student is responsible for making arrangements. Requirements include maintaining a daily log, supervisor evaluations, and a final report.

    Grading Restriction: Satisfactory/No Credit grading only.
    Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
    Registration Permission: Consent of instructor.
  
  •  

    ESS 495 - Professional Certificate Review

    1 Credit Hours
    This team-taught class will help students review and prepare for the Fundamentals of Soil Science and Professional Practice exam leading to certification as a Professional Soil Scientist.

  
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    ESS 499 - Research Problem in Environmental and Soil Sciences

    1-6 Credit Hours
    Special research problems in environmental and soil sciences.

    Repeatability: May be repeated. Maximum 6 hours.
    Registration Restriction(s): Departmental approval.

(ETEC) Educational Technology

  
  •  

    ETEC 486 - Integrating Technology into the Curriculum

    3 Credit Hours
    Use of technology to support teaching and learning; designed to prepare teacher preparation students to integrate a variety of computer-based technologies into the PreK-12 curriculum and adapt these technologies for diverse populations including students with mild disabilities as well as ESL students. Includes strategies and techniques of integrating the Internet, digital images, digital stories, multimedia, web-based tools, mobile apps, and interactive whiteboards.

    Registration Restriction(s): Admission to Teacher Education.

(FDSC) Food Science

  
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    FDSC 100 - Science of Food

    3 Credit Hours
    Introduction to food science, basic principles of food science.

  
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    FDSC 150 - History and Culture of Food

    3 Credit Hours
    Impact of people and historical events on the production, distribution, and consumption patterns of food. The role of food as an indicator of cultural, societal, and historical changes around the world. Major technological advances in food processing and their impact on the globalization of the food supply.

    Satisfies General Education Requirement: (CC)
    Contact Hour Distribution: 3 hours lecture.
  
  •  

    FDSC 201 - Professional Development

    1 Credit Hours
    Professional development expectations and opportunities. Individual written and oral reports. Group discussions on careers and food companies.

    Registration Restriction(s): Minimum student level – sophomore.
  
  •  

    FDSC 241 - Food Preservation and Packaging

    3 Credit Hours
    Principles, methods, and equipment used for preservation of foods.

    Contact Hour Distribution: 2 hours lecture and 1 lab.
 

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